Recent press: Quick Sip Reviews on my poem ‘Instructions for Astronauts’: ‘strange and haunting’

Thank you to Charles Payseur at Quick Sip Reviews for taking the time to read my work and write about it. Very cool!

Quick snippet “strange and haunting” and “great”!

If you need more, here are some snippets from his review of “Instructions for Astronauts”:

This is a rather strange and haunting poem about humanity fleeing Earth in an attempt to survive, in an attempt to get to a different and better world, one unspoiled by our touch.

 

There is a strong religious element to the poem, all of the parts preceded by a biblical verse (save two) to set up how those sections read. These are the sections of the believers, of the grand hope for humanity. The renewal, the what-have-you. And I love that the poem sets itself up that way, with everything working and working toward this end, only to pull away at the ending …

He also calls the video “An amazing experience!”

Wow! Read what he wrote here.

Here’s the video

 

 

Recent press: Times Union on my Pushcart nomination

Screen Shot 2017-04-26 at 8.57.49 PM

If you read my announcement on this blog last week, then you already know this news. But it caught the attention of the good people at the Albany Times Union, including current arts editor Gary Hahn. He worked his magic and one of the newest hires to the TU, Sara Tracey, was kind enough to write up my literary news.

Thank you, Gary and Sara!

You can read the full story here: http://www.timesunion.com/news/article/Delmar-writer-s-poem-nominated-for-Pushcart-Prize-11089133.php

This was also buttressed from some really great social media mentions. Here’s a Twitter sampling

 

Watch: My poem ‘Instructions for Astronauts’ now a video

You can also read the poem at Mithila Review.

My poem ‘For Your Own Safety’ Nominated for a Pushcart Prize

So here’s a screenshot of something that I just saw today on the SF Poetry website:

Screen Shot 2017-04-19 at 9.19.10 PM

Thank you, Star*Line magazine for the recognition!

I won’t know until much later this year if my poem gets picked.

The poem isn’t available online, but you can buy the edition it is in from http://www.sfpoetry.com/sl/issues/starline39.1.html. And it was inspired by the figure below, a work of art called Refugee Astronaut by the artist Yinka Shonibare, MBE.

ref-ast-front

Yinka Shonibare, MBE’s “Refugee Astronaut,” 2015, photograph by Michael Janairo

Thank you, Mithila Review!

My new speculative poem, Instructions for Astronauts, appears in the new edition of The Mithila Review!

It has also been made into a video. Check it out:

 

Ajapa Sharma, one of the co-founding editors of the journal, writes in the introduction:

When we read Michael Janairo’s submission “Instructions for Astronauts” for this issue, it resonated with some of the themes of our favorite space-based films and series. SyFy’s series based on James S.A. Corey’s Hugo award winning books, The Expanse has been our staple since season 2 of the series started airing in February. Against all criticisms, we’ve also thoroughly enjoyed Ridley Scott’s Prometheus and are eagerly waiting to watch Alien: Covenant later this year. Janairo’s poem captured elements that have traditionally been a part of science fiction’s visual corpus and his stellar voice quality made it all the more adaptable for a film. Working with Michael’s poetry, it became evident that good visual material can only come from excellent writing. The visual, after all, is an innovative translation of a textual script. The hope is that the video will become a medium through which Janairo’s poetry can travel far and wide.

Excerpt From: Salik Shah, Editor. “Mithila Review – Issue 8.”

Thank you, World Haiku Review

Thank you, World Haiku Review, for publishing my work in the latest edition.

 

screen-shot-2017-01-28-at-9-32-21-am

A note about the erasure poem ‘Heart Heal’

An erasure poem is part of a tradition of using pre-existing texts, stripping away some of the words, and revealing a new creation with what remains. The erasure part echoes the kind of blacking out of text used when classified information is made public. A good definition can be found on the Found Poetry Review’s website at http://www.foundpoetryreview.com/about-found-poetry.

My erasure poem comes from page 46 of the book The Art of the Deal, attributed to but not really written at all by Donald Trump. Continue reading